Philly's Freedom: Artist's Speak Out

National Liberty Museum

Reciprocal Interactive Exhibit

    Hear the voices of Philadelphia’s under-represented artists as you experience their works more deeply through this site that both enhances, and is enhanced by, its companion museum installation.

    For ages, fine arts have been a vehicle for passionate creators with something to express, but the portion of artists whose voice has reached the masses in many communities has been limited by race and gender. Driven by a desire to bring change to this stagnant system, the National Liberty Museum of Philadelphia rallied to create a new exhibit called Philly’s Freedom: Artists Speak Out which we felt deserved any support we could provide. Our contribution to the physical museum installation came in the form of a reciprocal digital strategy that literally brought the voices of artists to the ears of everyone. Built on an easily accessible web platform, our experience let visitors dive deeper into the story behind select pieces in the exhibition by allowing them see pictures of the featured art, read more about the creator who produced the work, view behind the scenes or in-progress photos, and hear statements about the exhibit from the artists themselves.

    Although accessible to anyone, anywhere, the site was especially beneficial for visitors to the museum, who could scan QR codes mounted beside select pieces which took them directly to the corresponding in-depth artist information. This came with an added benefit since the exhibition was launched during the Covid-19 pandemic and QR codes present a touchless way for guests to activate interactive content on their personal device. In keeping with the exhibit’s message, and galvanized by voices in our community, the look and feel of the experience drew upon the Black Lives Matter movement who—although not officially involved with the project—served as an inspiration to elevate under-represented voices so that their message could be heard. It is our hope that this exhibition and digital experience emboldens artists who have long stayed silent, and encourages the arts community to recognize that people of all races and genders belong in the evolving story of American art.